Another English exercise..

les24preludes

Legendary Member
I foresee water shortages this summer. 1995 was a dry year and if this year is similar we could fall to 40% reservoir capacity. This kicks in during the Autumn as you can see in the graph of SW Water. This is what we can expect from climate change and global warming going forwards, so I hope governments will stop calling it "unexpected" or "unusual".

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Paper Plane

Legendary Member
If it was going to rain, maybe this would take a little heat (and stress) from everybody and we could all cool down a bit.

steve
 

Boycie83

Forum GOD!
I foresee water shortages this summer. 1995 was a dry year and if this year is similar we could fall to 40% reservoir capacity. This kicks in during the Autumn as you can see in the graph of SW Water. This is what we can expect from climate change and global warming going forwards, so I hope governments will stop calling it "unexpected" or "unusual".

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Interesting to think there could be water shortages when some of the country was under water only a few months ago.
 
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les24preludes

Legendary Member
Interesting to think there could be water shortages when some of the country was under water only a few months ago.
We have been told to expect more extreme weather as a result of climate change. How it balances out I don't know - a mixture of dry months and occasional downpours and floods. It also depends on public demand for water, so I'd expect rationing to be more frequent. Yet another clash between freedom and social responsibility when it comes to watering lawns and gardens etc etc. It never stops.
 

Steve

Boomer Member
Yet another clash between freedom and social responsibility
You should move to Hong Kong. The Chicom government would welcome you with open arms. There is no clash. There are only those who love their freedom, and those who would take it away.
 

les24preludes

Legendary Member
You should move to Hong Kong. The Chicom government would welcome you with open arms. There is no clash. There are only those who love their freedom, and those who would take it away.
That has very little to do with social responsibility in the sense that I'm discussing it, but by all means let's move on.
 

UKRob

Forum GOD!
We have been told to expect more extreme weather as a result of climate change. How it balances out I don't know - a mixture of dry months and occasional downpours and floods. It also depends on public demand for water, so I'd expect rationing to be more frequent. Yet another clash between freedom and social responsibility when it comes to watering lawns and gardens etc etc. It never stops.
Climate change or not - nothing changes the amount of water we have recourse to - how we manage that is a different matter. Stopping water seepage in countries that have an adequate supply is easily achieved. De-salination of sea water in other countries would cost far less than Covid19 precautions. It just down to a matter of choice.
 

les24preludes

Legendary Member
Climate change or not - nothing changes the amount of water we have recourse to - how we manage that is a different matter. Stopping water seepage in countries that have an adequate supply is easily achieved. De-salination of sea water in other countries would cost far less than Covid19 precautions. It just down to a matter of choice.
We can change the amount of water we have recourse to by building a desalination plant, as you say. I've never heard anyone discuss this but it may come in future. Desalination plants operate in more than 120 countries in the world, including Saudi Arabia, Oman, United Arab Emirates, Spain, Cyprus, Malta, Gibraltar, Cape Verde, Portugal, Greece, Italy, India, China, Japan, and Australia. I wasn't aware that Spain and Italy needed desalination but seems the case. That's for posting this.

Looking a bit further into this I see the UK does have a desalination plant in Beckton, E.London. It was built in 2010 at a cost of £250m. The plant provides up to 150 million litres of drinking water each day (150,000 cubic metres) – enough for nearly one million people.
 
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